JackRussellDaily

DETERRING YOUR JRT FROM DESTRUCTIVE CHEWING

Your JRT puppy may be cutting teeth, and the chewing helps to break the gums allowing the teeth to push through.   Help your puppy with their need to chew at this time by providing them toys and such to chew on.  There are some very fine toys available on the market today, geared and engineered towards helping to relieve teething discomfort.

In your adult JRT, normal chewing behavior is common.  It is natures way of keeping their jaws strong, and their teeth clean.  The very act of chewing helps to keep the tarter cleaned off their teeth, preventing the onset of gum disease and tooth loss.

It is normal for your JRT to chew on things:  sticks, bones, what have you.  They see the act of chewing as fun, a source of stimulation, a means of keeping occupied, and as a means of dealing with anxiety.

Yes, anxiety.  Separation anxiety is one of the major causes of chewing in most adult JRT’s.  It is during this anxiety that they may be at their most destructive.  They work themselves up, and get so upset, that they lash out by way of destructive chewing.

But, how do you solve the problem of your adult JRT’s destructive chewing?                                            

If your JRT is a puppy, or a newly acquired family companion, closely monitor your JRT until they learn the house rules.  When you observe them chewing where and when they shouldn’t, make sure you let them know they are misbehaving.  Usually taking a firm tone, then moving them away from the area, or the item away from them will eventually get the point across. You must be consistent in this though, because if one time they are allowed to chew on the item, and the next they are not, then this only serves to confuse them even further.

Isolate your JRT when you are not there to monitor their behavior.  When you leave the house, no matter the length of time, place your JRT in a small, closed off area, or even in a crate.  Make sure that there is nothing that is chewable within their reach, thus not affording them the ability to lash out and chew, and that they have plenty of fresh water.

When choosing acceptable toys for your JRT, make sure they are easily distinguishable as toys that they are allowed to chew on.  Giving your JRT an old sock or shoe only serves to confuse them.  By giving them this type of chew toy, they are confused when they are corrected or scolded for chewing on the socks and shoes not designated as theirs.

“Dog Proof” your house.  Any objects that you do not want them chewing on, make sure to put them up out of your JRT’s reach.  This will take away both the availability and temptation that the item presents.

Then, provide your JRT with chew able toys of their very own.  Toys that are made for extended periods of chewing, as well as those that are of benefit to tooth and gum health are the ones that are best.  To keep your JRT from getting bored with their toys, rotate in new ones about once every two to three weeks.  This way, they will stay interested in their permitted chew able, and not so much the ones they are supposed to stay away from.

With those particularly persistent JRT’s, it may be necessary to use a spray deterrent of some sort.  The JRT will associate the item sprayer with the deterrent with an unpleasant taste and will not bother it again.  Spray any items that are proving particularly difficult of breaking your JRT from.    

Lastly, your JRT may be acting out and chewing because of boredom.  The JRT breed needs lots of exercise, play, and stimulation.  Make sure they get their needed walks as well as romping time. Being able to burn off their natural energy, will help keep them from working that energy off in other ways.

THE HISTORY OF THE JACK RUSSELL TERRIER

The modern day Jack Russell Terrier traces its origins back to the early 19th Century, to a dog name Trump, whom was purchased by the Reverend John Russell. The Reverend John Russell, from whom the Jack Russell Terrier takes its name and were first bred by, can trace their origins back to the now extinct English White Terrier.


The Reverend John Russell bred and developed the breed primarily for fox hunting.  Because of their muscular and sturdy build, the Jack Russell Terrier was the perfect hunting companion, able to actually go back into the den and ferret the foxes out.

Jack Russells are similar to the modern day breed of Fox Terriers, with whom they are commonly confused with, as well as the Parsons Russell Terrier and the Russell Terrier.  Unlike the aforementioned Parsons and Russell Terrier, the Jack Russell Terrier is not a breed currently recognized by the AKC.

The Jack Russell terrier is a very exuberant and active breed, that needs frequent stimulation and a high level of exercise.  It is because of this exuberance and stamina that they are the perfect companions on fox hunts, as they can rustle the prey out of its den, without causing any bodily harm to themselves or the prey.

Although the lineage of the modern day Jack Russell Terrier dates back to the early 19th Century, after World War II their role of hunting companion turned to that of family pets.  It was at this time that they were commonly cross bred with Welsh Corgi’s, Chihuahua’s and other small breeds of terrier.  These combinations were commonly referred to as “Puddin Dogs”, “Shortie Jacks” or “Russell Terriers”.

In the late 1990’s the AKC considered acknowledging the breed of the Jack Russell Terrier officially, but the JRTCA (Jack Russell Terrier Club of America) didn’t want the acknowledgement made official.  After altering the previous standards for consideration, the AKC accepted the breed in 2001, but as the Parson Russell Terrier.  The modern day version of the Jack Russell Terrier is still not recognized by the AKC.

Due to the working nature of the breed, the Jack Russell Terrier has remained very much the same for 200 years–exuburent, vibrant, and energetic.  Because they are so alert and always attentive, they make wonderful breeds for training.  They are featured in many TV shows, ads, and Movies. Wishbone, the RCA Victrola dog, and Eddie (from Frasier) are a few of the more well known Jack Russell’s.

The typical Jack Russell Terrier can live a long, healthy life, with the average life span being 13-16 years. For a list of health conditions that tend to afflict the Jack Russell Terrier, note the previous post Health Conditions to Look for in your Jack Russell Terrier.

   FIND US ON FACEBOOK

 

TRAINING YOUR JACK RUSSELL TERRIER

 

 

TRAINING YOUR JRT TO A LEASH

SOCIALIZING YOUR JACK RUSSELL TERRIER

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

 



 

 

A video posted by Kevin Lam (@drkevinlam) on

 

 

 

HELPING YOUR JRT BEAT THE HEAT

 

POSSIBLE STRESS TRIGGERS FOR YOUR JACK RUSSELL TERRIER

 


HELPING YOUR JRT COPE WITH STRESS

 

JRT PROOFING YOUR HOME

 

DETERRING YOUR JRT FROM DESTRUCTIVE CHEWING

DEALING WITH SHEDDING JACK RUSSELL TERRIER

 

Page 1 2 3 Last

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...